Are You An Effective Coach?

Image of a coach giving thumbs up.Contrary to popular belief, it appears as if cheering someone on to improve performance does not influence people as much as role modeling does. Studies cited by Harvard Business Review reveal that both approaches improve outcomes. People encouraged by ‘cheerleaders’ increased performance by 22% while those coached by the silent type improved by 33%.

When you think about it, these outcomes make sense. It all has to do with setting expectations. A “C’mon, you can do it!” kind of coach frames the experience by counting down to an arbitrary end point. Their focus: Put in just enough time to ‘gut it out to the end.’ Silent trainers come from a completely different perspective. There is no stated end point. Instead, these trainers focus on the discipline needed to do your personal best. Thus, each style produces very different results.

You may want to consider how to best frame the experience next time you’re looking to improve outcomes for the people you’re leading. Those who try to perform their personal best day after day build the strongest companies. And, they don’t get in the habit of watching the clock.

Image courtesy of © michaeljung – Fotolia.com

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